Journal cover Journal topic
Geoscientific Instrumentation, Methods and Data Systems An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
doi:10.5194/gi-2016-37
© Author(s) 2016. This work is distributed
under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Research article
16 Dec 2016
Review status
A revision of this discussion paper was accepted for the journal Geoscientific Instrumentation, Methods and Data Systems (GI) and is expected to appear here in due course.
Radiometric flight results from the HyperSpectral Imager for Climate Science (HySICS)
Greg Kopp1, Paul Smith1, Chris Belting1, Ginger Drake1, Joey Espejo1, Karl Heuerman1, James Lanzi2, and Dave Stuchlik2 1Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80303, USA
2NASA Wallops Flight Facility, Wallops Island, VA 23337, USA
Abstract. Long-term monitoring of the Earth-reflected solar-spectrum is necessary for discerning and attributing changes in climate. High radiometric-accuracy enables such monitoring over decadal timescales with non-overlapping instruments, and high precision enables trend detection on shorter timescales. The Hyperspectral Imager for Climate Science (HySICS) is a visible and near-infrared spatial/spectral imaging-spectrometer intended to ultimately achieve ~ 0.2 % radiometric accuracies of Earth scenes from space, providing an order-of-magnitude improvement over existing space-based imagers. On-orbit calibrations from measurements of spectral solar irradiances acquired by direct views of the Sun enable radiometric calibrations with superior long-term stability than currently possible with any manmade spaceflight light-source or detector. Solar- and lunar-observations enable in-flight focal-plane-array flat-fielding and other instrument calibrations. The HySICS has demonstrated this solar cross-calibration technique for future spaceflight instrumentation via two high-altitude balloon flights. The second of these two flights acquired high radiometric-accuracy measurements of the ground, clouds, the Earth's limb, and the Moon. Those results and the details of the uncertainty analyses of those flight data are described.

Citation: Kopp, G., Smith, P., Belting, C., Drake, G., Espejo, J., Heuerman, K., Lanzi, J., and Stuchlik, D.: Radiometric flight results from the HyperSpectral Imager for Climate Science (HySICS), Geosci. Instrum. Method. Data Syst. Discuss., doi:10.5194/gi-2016-37, in review, 2016.
Greg Kopp et al.
Greg Kopp et al.

Viewed

Total article views: 229 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)

HTML PDF XML Total BibTeX EndNote
201 21 7 229 3 6

Views and downloads (calculated since 16 Dec 2016)

Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 16 Dec 2016)

Viewed (geographical distribution)

Total article views: 229 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)

Thereof 227 with geography defined and 2 with unknown origin.

Country # Views %
  • 1

Saved

Discussed

Latest update: 24 Mar 2017
Publications Copernicus
Download
Short summary
Monitoring and attributing changes in Earth climate requires high radiometric-accuracy spectral measurements of sunlight reflected from the Earth's surface. The Hyperspectral Imager for Climate Science (HySICS) is a new imaging-spectrometer intended to ultimately achieve ~ 0.2 % radiometric accuracies, being ~ 10× better than existing space-flight instruments. We describe the results from a high-altitude balloon flight demonstrating techniques intended to meet these high-accuracy requirements.
Monitoring and attributing changes in Earth climate requires high radiometric-accuracy spectral...
Share