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Geoscientific Instrumentation, Methods and Data Systems An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Discussion papers
https://doi.org/10.5194/gi-2017-50
© Author(s) 2017. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/gi-2017-50
© Author(s) 2017. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 22 Dec 2017

Research article | 22 Dec 2017

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This discussion paper is a preprint. A revision of this manuscript was accepted for the journal Geoscientific Instrumentation, Methods and Data Systems (GI) and is expected to appear here in due course.

Mars sub-millimeter sensor on micro-satellite: sensor feasibility study

Richard Larsson1, Yasuko Kasai1, Takeshi Kuroda1, Shigeru Sato1, Hiroyuki Maezawa2, Yutaka Haseagwa3, Toshiyuki Nishibori4, and Shinichi Nakasuka5 Richard Larsson et al.
  • 1National Institute of Information and Communications Technology, Tokyo, Japan
  • 2Osaka Prefecture University, Osaka, Japan
  • 3Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency, Tokyo, Japan
  • 4Research and Development Directorate, Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency, Tokyo, Japan
  • 5Tokyo University, Tokyo, Japan

Abstract. We are planning a mission to Mars using a micro-satellite to carry a sub-millimeter sensor to orbit and have performed a feasibility study to determine what we can measure and to what success. The sensor will measure atmospheric molecular oxygen, water, ozone, and hydrogen peroxide to retrieve their volume mixing ratios and change over time. The sensor will also retrieve the temperature field, the wind field, and the magnetic field at various levels of success. The expected measurement errors for molecular oxygen is below 100ppmv in limb view below 50km, with 20ppmv for near surface measurements. For water in limb-view, the retrieval errors are below 1ppmv with a detection limit of a few tens of ppbv. For ozone the limits are at 2ppbv, and for hydrogen peroxide the retrieval limits are in the range of 1ppbv. In nadir-viewing geometry, the expected errors in the column are worse but not by much since we can keep integrating the signal from the same area for a long time, though the vertical resolution clearly suffers.

Richard Larsson et al.
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Interactive discussion
Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement
Richard Larsson et al.
Richard Larsson et al.
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Latest update: 12 Dec 2018
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Short summary
We are planning a Mars mission. The mission will carry an instrument capable of measuring and mapping molecular oxygen and water in the Martian atmosphere, as well as the temperature, wind, and magnetic field. Water and oxygen are vital parts of the Martian atmospheric chemistry and must be better understood. Using computer simulation results, the paper gives a description of how the measurements will work, some problems we expect to encounter, and the sensitivity of the measurements.
We are planning a Mars mission. The mission will carry an instrument capable of measuring and...
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