Journal metrics

Journal metrics

  • IF value: 1.319 IF 1.319
  • IF 5-year value: 1.299 IF 5-year 1.299
  • CiteScore value: 1.27 CiteScore 1.27
  • SNIP value: 0.740 SNIP 0.740
  • SJR value: 0.598 SJR 0.598
  • IPP value: 1.21 IPP 1.21
  • h5-index value: 12 h5-index 12
  • Scimago H index value: 6 Scimago H index 6
Discussion papers | Copyright
https://doi.org/10.5194/gi-2018-42
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 05 Oct 2018

Research article | 05 Oct 2018

Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. It is a manuscript under review for the journal Geoscientific Instrumentation, Methods and Data Systems (GI).

The influence of sample geometry on the permeability of a porous sandstone

Michael J. Heap Michael J. Heap
  • Géophysique Expérimentale, Institut de Physique de Globe de Strasbourg (UMR 7516 CNRS, Université de Strasbourg/EOST), 5 rue René Descartes, 67084 Strasbourg cedex, France

Abstract. Although detailed guidelines exist for measuring the physical and mechanical properties of laboratory rock samples, guidelines for laboratory measurements of permeability are sparse. Provided herein are gas permeability measurements of cylindrical samples of Darley Dale sandstone (with a connected porosity of 0.135 and a pore- and grain-size of 0.2–0.3mm) with different diameters (10, 20, and 25mm) and lengths (from 60 to 10mm), corresponding to aspect (length/diameter) ratios between 6.2 and 0.4. These data show that, despite the large range in sample length, aspect ratio, and bulk volume (from 29.7 to 1.9cm3), the permeabilities of the Darley Dale sandstone samples are near identical (3–4×10–15m2). The near identical permeability of these samples is considered the consequence of the homogeneous porosity structure typical of porous sandstones, and the small grain- and pore-size of Darley Dale sandstone with respect to the minimum tested diameter and length (both 10mm). Laboratory permeability measurements on rock samples with inhomogeneous porosity structures, or with larger grain- and pore-sizes, may still provide erroneous values if their length, diameter, and/or aspect ratio is low. Permeability measurements on rocks with vastly different microstructural properties should now be conducted in a similar manner to help develop detailed guidelines for laboratory measurements of permeability.

Michael J. Heap
Interactive discussion
Status: open (until 30 Nov 2018)
Status: open (until 30 Nov 2018)
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
[Subscribe to comment alert] Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement
Michael J. Heap
Michael J. Heap
Viewed
Total article views: 106 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total BibTeX EndNote
79 21 6 106 6 8
  • HTML: 79
  • PDF: 21
  • XML: 6
  • Total: 106
  • BibTeX: 6
  • EndNote: 8
Views and downloads (calculated since 05 Oct 2018)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 05 Oct 2018)
Viewed (geographical distribution)
Total article views: 106 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 105 with geography defined and 1 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 
Cited
Saved
No saved metrics found.
Discussed
No discussed metrics found.
Latest update: 16 Oct 2018
Publications Copernicus
Download
Short summary
To better understand the influence of sample geometry on laboratory measurements of permeability, the permeabilities of sandstone samples with different lengths and diameters were measured. Despite the large range in length, aspect ratio, and volume, the permeabilities of the samples are near identical. This is due to a homogeneous porosity structure and the small grain/pore size with respect to the minimum tested diameter and length. More tests are now needed to help develop such guidelines.
To better understand the influence of sample geometry on laboratory measurements of...
Citation
Share