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Geoscientific Instrumentation, Methods and Data Systems An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Discussion papers
https://doi.org/10.5194/gi-2018-44
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/gi-2018-44
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 15 Nov 2018

Research article | 15 Nov 2018

Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. A revision of this manuscript was accepted for the journal Geoscientific Instrumentation, Methods and Data Systems (GI) and is expected to appear here in due course.

A low-cost device for measuring local magnetic anomalies in volcanic terrain

Bertwin M. de Groot1,2 and Lennart V. de Groot1 Bertwin M. de Groot and Lennart V. de Groot
  • 1Paleomagnetic laboratory Fort Hoofddijk, Utrecht University, Budapestlaan 17, 3584 CD Utrecht, the Netherlands
  • 2Technical & Analytical Support Earth Sciences, Utrecht University, Princetonlaan 8a, 3584 CB Utrecht, the Netherlands

Abstract. Reconstructions of the past behavior of the geomagnetic field critically depend on the magnetic signal stored in extrusive igneous rocks. These rocks record the Earth's magnetic field when they cool and retain this magnetization on geological time scales. In rugged volcanic terrain, however, the magnetic signal arising from the underlying flows may influence the ambient magnetic field as recorded by newly formed flows on top. To measure these local anomalies in the Earth's magnetic field directly we developed a low-cost field magnetometer based on a flux gate sensor. To improve the accuracy of the obtained paleomagnetic vector and user friendliness of the device we combined this flux gate sensor with tilt and GPS sensors to rotate the measured magnetic vector to true North, East and down. The data acquisition is done using a ruggedized laptop and data are immediately available for first order interpretation. The first measurements done on Mt. Etna show local variations in the ambient magnetic field larger than expected, and illustrate both the accuracy (certainly < 0.5° in paleomagnetic direction) and potential of our new device.

Bertwin M. de Groot and Lennart V. de Groot
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Interactive discussion
Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement
Bertwin M. de Groot and Lennart V. de Groot
Bertwin M. de Groot and Lennart V. de Groot
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Latest update: 23 Jul 2019
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Short summary
Our knowledge of the Earth's magnetic field arises from magnetic signals stored in lavas. In rugged volcanic terrain, however, the magnetization of the underlying flows may influence the magnetic field as recorded by newly formed flows on top. To measure these local magnetic anomalies, we developed a low-cost field magnetometer with superior accuracy and user-friendliness. The first measurements on Mt. Etna show local magnetic variations that are much larger than expected.
Our knowledge of the Earth's magnetic field arises from magnetic signals stored in lavas. In...
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