Journal cover Journal topic
Geoscientific Instrumentation, Methods and Data Systems An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
Journal topic

Journal metrics

Journal metrics

  • IF value: 1.302 IF 1.302
  • IF 5-year value: 1.356 IF 5-year
    1.356
  • CiteScore value: 1.47 CiteScore
    1.47
  • SNIP value: 0.810 SNIP 0.810
  • IPP value: 1.37 IPP 1.37
  • SJR value: 0.598 SJR 0.598
  • Scimago H <br class='hide-on-tablet hide-on-mobile'>index value: 8 Scimago H
    index 8
  • h5-index value: 14 h5-index 14
Discussion papers
https://doi.org/10.5194/gi-2019-34
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/gi-2019-34
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Submitted as: research article 30 Oct 2019

Submitted as: research article | 30 Oct 2019

Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. It is a manuscript under review for the journal Geoscientific Instrumentation, Methods and Data Systems (GI).

Mesospheric winds measured by MF radar with Full Correlation Analysis: error properties and impacts on studies of wind variance

Maude Gibbins1,2 and Andrew Kavanagh2,3 Maude Gibbins and Andrew Kavanagh
  • 1Formerly the University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK
  • 2British Antarctic Survey, High Cross, Madingley Road, Cambridge, CB3 0ET, UK
  • 3Visiting Scientist at RAL Space, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell, Oxford, OX110QX, UK

Abstract. The mesosphere is one of the most difficult parts of the atmosphere to sample; too high for balloon measurements and too low for in-situ satellites. Consequently there is a reliance on remote sensing (either from the ground or from space) to diagnose this region. Ground based radars have been used since the second half of the 20th century to probe the dynamics of the mesosphere; Medium Frequency (MF) radars provide estimates of the horizontal wind fields and are still used to analyse tidal structures and planetary waves that modulate the meridional and zonal winds. The variance of the winds has traditionally been linked qualitatively to the occurrence of gravity waves. In this paper the method of wind retrieval (full correlation analysis) employed by MF radars is considered with reference to two systems in Antarctica at different latitude (Halley at 76° S and Rothera at 67° S). It is shown that the width of the velocity distribution and occurrence of ‘outliers’ is related to the measured levels of anisotropy in the received signal pattern. The magnitude of the error distribution, as represented by the wind variance, varies with both insolation levels and geomagnetic activity. Thus it is demonstrated that for these two radars the influence of gravity waves may not be the primary mechanism that controls the overall variance.

Maude Gibbins and Andrew Kavanagh
Interactive discussion
Status: open (until 27 Dec 2019)
Status: open (until 27 Dec 2019)
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
[Subscribe to comment alert] Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement
Maude Gibbins and Andrew Kavanagh
Maude Gibbins and Andrew Kavanagh
Viewed  
Total article views: 122 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total BibTeX EndNote
106 14 2 122 2 2
  • HTML: 106
  • PDF: 14
  • XML: 2
  • Total: 122
  • BibTeX: 2
  • EndNote: 2
Views and downloads (calculated since 30 Oct 2019)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 30 Oct 2019)
Viewed (geographical distribution)  
Total article views: 90 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 89 with geography defined and 1 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 
Cited  
Saved  
No saved metrics found.
Discussed  
No discussed metrics found.
Latest update: 20 Nov 2019
Publications Copernicus
Download
Short summary
Middle Frequency radars measure winds (between 55 & 100 km altitude). As part of their final year undergraduate project, the lead author used 2 radars in Antarctica to look at how the wind speed varied with the aim of identifying when the wind was too fast to be a real measurement. Instead we discovered that the variance depends strongly on factors in the analysis technique rather than due to natural features such as gravity waves, and that the sun and geomagnetic activity play a role.
Middle Frequency radars measure winds (between 55 & 100 km altitude). As part of their final...
Citation