Journal cover Journal topic
Geoscientific Instrumentation, Methods and Data Systems An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
Journal topic

Journal metrics

Journal metrics

  • IF value: 1.302 IF 1.302
  • IF 5-year value: 1.356 IF 5-year
    1.356
  • CiteScore value: 1.47 CiteScore
    1.47
  • SNIP value: 0.810 SNIP 0.810
  • IPP value: 1.37 IPP 1.37
  • SJR value: 0.598 SJR 0.598
  • Scimago H <br class='hide-on-tablet hide-on-mobile'>index value: 8 Scimago H
    index 8
  • h5-index value: 14 h5-index 14
Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/gi-2020-1
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/gi-2020-1
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Submitted as: research article 09 Mar 2020

Submitted as: research article | 09 Mar 2020

Review status
This preprint is currently under review for the journal GI.

A Global Geographic Grid System for Visualizing Bathymetry

Colin Ware1, Larry Mayer1, Paul Johnson1, Martin Jakobsson2, and Vicki Ferrini3 Colin Ware et al.
  • 1Center for Coastal and Ocean Mapping, University of New Hampshire, Durham NH, 03924, USA
  • 2Department of Geological Sciences, StockholmUniversity, Stockholm, Sweden
  • 3Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University, USA

Abstract. A Global Geographic Grid System (Global GGS) is here introduced to support the display of gridded bathymetric data at whatever resolution is available in a visually seamless manner. The Global GGS combines a quad-tree metagrid hierarchy with a system of compatible data grids. Metagrid nodes define the boundaries of data grids. Data grids are regular grids of depth values, coarse grids are used to represent sparse data and finer grids are used to represent high resolution data. Both metagrids and data grids are defined in geographic coordinates to allow broad compatibility with the widest range of geospatial software packages. An important goal of the Global GGS is to support the meshing of adjacent tiles with different resolutions so as to create a seamless surface. This is accomplished by ensuring that abutting data grids either match exactly with respect to their grid-cell size or only differ by powers of two. The oversampling of geographic data grids, which occurs towards the poles due to the convergence of meridians, is addressed by reducing the number of columns (longitude sampling) by powers of two at appropriate lines of latitude. In addition to the specification of the Global GGS. This paper describes a proof-of-concept implementation and some possible variants.

Colin Ware et al.

Interactive discussion

Status: open (until 12 Jun 2020)
Status: open (until 12 Jun 2020)
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
[Subscribe to comment alert] Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement

Colin Ware et al.

Colin Ware et al.

Viewed

Total article views: 133 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total BibTeX EndNote
110 21 2 133 5 5
  • HTML: 110
  • PDF: 21
  • XML: 2
  • Total: 133
  • BibTeX: 5
  • EndNote: 5
Views and downloads (calculated since 09 Mar 2020)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 09 Mar 2020)

Viewed (geographical distribution)

Total article views: 118 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 117 with geography defined and 1 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 

Cited

Saved

No saved metrics found.

Discussed

No discussed metrics found.
Latest update: 24 May 2020
Publications Copernicus
Download
Short summary
Geographic coordinates (latitude and longitude) are widely used in geospatial applications and terrains are often defined by regular grids in geographic coordinates. However, because of convergence of lines of longitude near the poles there is oversampling in the latitude (zonal) direction. Also, there is no standard way of defining a hierarchy of grids to consistently deal with data having different spatial resolutions. The proposed Global Geographic Grid System solves both problems.
Geographic coordinates (latitude and longitude) are widely used in geospatial applications and...
Citation